Turf Tank Automated Paint Robot

Robot

The crew at Canyon View Park is excited to show off the newest addition to the Parks and Recreation Department, the Turf Tank Automated Paint Robot. Canyon View crews typically spend about five days pulling string lines and measuring tapes making sure that fields are properly laid out for the spring and fall sports seasons. Crews are responsible for laying out almost 50 soccer, lacrosse, football and flag football fields for each season at Canyon View Park, Bookcliff Middle School and Dixson fields.

After three days of training with a representative from Turf Tank, crews were able to build fields at Canyon View with GPS coordinates. Canyon View staff will be able to paint fields more efficiently with less paint used, less labor due to layout being done within the program as well as pinpoint accuracy on the lines and measurements of fields. Next time you are out at Canyon View Park take a look at the lines and look at the accuracy in which the lines were painted. The technology and the cost savings of the Turf Tank robot is going to be a huge asset for the community and the Parks and Recreation staff.


Contact: Marc Mancuso, Parks Supervisor,  970-254-3850 or marcm@gjcity.org

Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture Grants Awarded

The local community will enjoy many new and fun cultural events this year thanks to funding provided by the Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture & the City of Grand Junction. Twenty-one non-profit organizations received funding ranging from $900 – $3500. Organizations will bring cultural projects ranging from festivals, dance and theatrical performances, art camp, art exhibits and musical concerts to Grand Junction. The community will benefit from a broad diversity of projects that will reach a wide variety of interests and ages.

Many of these events are free or at a minimal cost to the public thanks to this grant. Organizations are anticipating $361,000 in revenue, paying 558 artists and projecting attendance/listening audience to be over a million people. Most of these organizations rely on volunteers to provide these projects for the community and this year it’s projected individuals will donate over 17,015 hours of volunteerism. The Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture congratulates the awardees and looks forward to an engaging 2020 season of arts and culture in Grand Junction.

The grant program is open to any Colorado non-profit agency for arts and cultural projects that are held in Grand Junction. The process opens in December and closes in February annually. For more information on the grant program and the following projects please visit our website at gjarts.org.

First Presbyterian Church – Christmas Choral Concert 2020, $900
Rocky Mountain, PBS – Arts District, $2,200
Grand Valley Public Radio – KAFM Arts and Entertainment Calendar, $2,300
Rocky Mountain Collage Society – Collage and Mixed Media Expo 2020, $1,945
Western Colorado Center for the Arts – Spring Art Week, $2,600
Grand Junction Senior Theater – Annual Stage Production, $2,200
Postvention – Healing with Art, Writing, and Movement for Youth, $1,855
Mesa County Library – Culture Fest 2020, $2,200
Western Colorado Watercolor Society – Rockies West National 2021, $1,000
Grand Junction Centennial Band – Summer Concert Series, $1,300
Messiah Choral Society of Grand Junction – Handels Messiah, $1,200
Western Colorado Writers Forum – Four Writing Projects, $2,500
Charisma Chorus – Summer Day Camp, $2,000
Music Spark – Holiday Concert, $2,700
Art Song – Grand Junction Concert Series, $1,000
Jazztopia – Jazz Workshop, $2,200
Downtown Grand Junction – Downtown Art Festival, $2,400
Super Rad Art Jam – Super Rad High School Art Show, $2,900
Geek Parties of the Grand Valley – Summer Shakespeare Series, $1,100
Museums of Western Colorado – 2020 Colorado West Chautauqua, $3,500


Contact: Lorie Gregor, Recreation Coordinator,  970-254-3876 or lorieg@gjcity.org

Life is Better in Summer Camp

camp

The City of Grand Junction Parks and Recreation summer camp season is gearing up and we want to make sure parents have all of the necessary information in advance. The first day of summer camp will be on Tuesday, May 26. That may seem like a long way away, but our Summer Camp Activity Guide is online now and available to customers at gjcity.org/camps.  We understand it is important for parents to have information in advance of this coming summer in order to make necessary plans. Summer Camp Registration will be open on Tuesday, March 10.

New this summer is two additional Little Sunshine Camp locations. These additional camps will allow for an increase in available participation spots for 5 and 6-year-old’s.  STARS Camp will be offered again at Bookcliff Middle School, East Middle School, Orchard Mesa Middle School and West Middle School. The popular SCORE camp, which focuses on athletics, will be held at Chipeta Elementary School with the TWEEN Camp, designed for 11-15-year-old’s set again to keep tweens active all summer long.

From STARS and SCORE Camp to our new Little Sunshines Camp, we have a camp to fit your child’s needs. Offered all summer long, Summer Camp is the cool place to be! If you have questions about which camp is right for your child, give our Parks and Recreation office a call at (970)254-3866.


For more information, please contact:
Contact: Emily Krause, Recreation Supervisor, emilyk@gjcity.org or 970-254-3875

City of Grand Junction Embarks on a Parks, Recreation, Open Space (PROS) Master Plan

The City of Grand Junction is beginning the process of completing a Parks, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Master Plan. This effort is growing out of the Comprehensive Plan process. A $56,250 Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) grant was secured towards the end of 2019, which will pay for a majority of the cost of the plan. A full inventory of amenities will be completed and parks, recreation and open space needs will be assessed. This includes completing a feasibility study for the most needed indoor recreation facilities. The resultant PROS Master Plan will guide priorities to improve the system.

At the heart of this effort will be a PROS Task Force to propel the Master Planning process forward. The City is looking for individuals interested in serving on this Task Force. The group will fulfill a similar function as the Comprehensive Plan Advisory Council (CPAC) with the Comprehensive Plan currently underway. The CPAC is a group of community members appointed by Council who is providing continual feedback throughout the Comprehensive Plan process.  Like the CPAC, membership on the PROS Task Force will be determined by appointment by the City Council. Members of the Task Force will be selected to achieve broad representation of community leaders and engaged citizens. If you would like to serve on the Task Force, please email a letter explaining your interest to allisonl@gjcity.org per these specifications.

Interested parties should submit a letter of interest including the following by February 28th:

  • Name and contact information (mailing address, phone number and email address).
  • Why are you interested in serving on the PROS Task Force?
  • What are your qualifications and strengths that would benefit the Task Force and the effort?
  • Any initial thoughts on the current Parks, Recreation and Open System you would like to share?
  • What would you like Council to know about you and your community involvement?  Please list work with public, private and non-profit agencies, as well as relevant professional experience.

This overall planning process, driven by resident feedback, will be a complete evaluation of the entire parks, recreation and open space system. In addition to the PROS Task Force, the public process will be extensive including focus groups with City Council, user groups and community wide meetings. A statistically valid survey will also be employed to gain representative input on what priorities should be pursued.


For more information, please contact:
Primary: Ken Sherbenou, Parks and Recreation Director, kensh@gjcity.org or 970-254-3881

Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan Celebration

Strategic Cultural Plan

The creative community will gather at the Lincoln Park Hospitality Suite on Thursday, February 6 from 5:30-7:00 P.M. to celebrate the accomplishments of the Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan. Revised in 2017, the Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan is driven by community members and spearheaded by the Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture. Each year the accomplishments of the goals and strategies of the plan are assessed as to their status of accomplishment and celebrated by the community. The public is invited to come and share in the accomplishments of the past year and contribute to the future visioning of arts and culture in their community.

Grand Junction is a regional leader that provides an exemplary quality of life, offers a diverse and vibrant business environment, functions as a regional hub for economic vitality, supports educational opportunities, has a reputation as a cultural destination, and is a magnet for new residents. The arts and cultural assets of this community are integral to success of Grand Junction as a regional leader and play a significant role in the economic health of the city and the surrounding area. Grand Junction’s rich history inextricably links art and culture with the community’s aspirations, accomplishments, resilience and its very character.

The Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan embraces a creative culture that respects cultural heritage while valuing and supporting the arts, artistic individuals and institutions. The plan offers greater public access and deeper engagement in arts and culture; advances arts education opportunities that inspire strong conceptual and problem-solving skills and cultivate creative leaders and collaborations. The plan also seeks a vibrant community strengthened by artists, arts entrepreneurs and activities and supports a healthy economy that arises from a diverse and creative workforce.

The content and recommendations resulting from public input and broad visioning underpin the Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan. It was developed and prioritized by goals within six key areas—Arts Education, Creative Districts/Creative Industry, Economic Impact, Historic Preservation/Science/History, Public Art, and Urban Design/Cultural Facilities. The plan strengthens and supports an important network of people—arts professionals, educators, policymakers, civic leaders, and families. To read the entire Grand Junction Strategic Cultural Plan go to http://www.gjarts.org, the plan is on the homepage.


For more information, please contact:
Primary: Lorie Gregor, Recreation Coordinator, lorieg@gjcity.org or 970-254-3876
Secondary: Emily Krause, Recreation Supervisor, emilyk@gjcity.org or 970-254-3875

Don’t Pay Someone to Destroy your Trees Hiring Licensed Tree Care Professionals

Incorrect Tree ToppingTrees planted, grown, and properly maintained within the landscapes of Grand Junction are an investment that pays back to the entire Grand Valley. Tree benefits increase as trees grow larger by providing more cooling shade, captured storm water, and filtered air population. The aesthetic beauty of large healthy shade trees attracts people to businesses, increases the time people like to spend shopping in an area, and increases the property value around them. The proper care of trees in our landscapes is key to protecting these investments and hiring the wrong person to maintain them can lead to the destruction of their long-term potential. In the interest of protecting the good health of trees, the City of Grand Junction requires individuals engaging in tree work to obtain a license through the City Forester and City Forestry Board.

According to Grand Junction city code, no person shall engage in the business of pruning or removing trees without first obtaining an annual license from the council appointed Forestry Board. The Forestry Board and City Forester have the responsibility to develop testing procedures for applicants to ensure unskilled individuals are not being paid to destroy the invested value of trees. The Grand Junction Parks and Recreation webpage provides residents with a list of licensed professional arborists to help connect people with the best local companies. With all this in place, the City Forester and Forestry Board have been surprised by the recent increase in substandard tree work in the Grand Valley.

At the January Forestry Board meeting, the City Forester and members of the board covered an agenda item around “tree topping” and bad tree work on private commercial property in various locations across the city. The board encouraged the City Forester to find a way to get the word out to residents to protect them from hiring a company that could end up destroying their tree.

Tree topping is the indiscriminate cutting of branches to create a much shorter and rounded-over canopy of stubbed branches leaving a final product that looks more like a hat rack than a tree. This type of shade tree cutting is most often performed to reduce the height of a tree to increase visibility of signage or views, and at times is requested due to a fear that large trees are dangerous. While tree topping makes trees shorter, it does not solve the desired outcome. Stub-cut tree limbs allow decay to easily enter tree branches leading to long-term hazardous conditions in trees, and the natural response of the tree is to produce numerous poorly attached small branches that grow up quickly further limiting visibility. Shade trees that have been topped have very little chance of being repaired, and it eliminates the ability of a tree to develop into a high-quality asset to a property.

While the City Forester encourages residents and business owners to take advantage of winter as a great time to hire a company to maintain private property trees, he also cautions everyone to ensure they’re hiring professional arborist to care for their trees. If you see what appears to be unskilled tree work happening in the city, take a picture and contact the City Forester.


For more information, please contact:
Primary: Rob Davis, Grand Junction City Forester, robd@gjcity.org or 970-254-3825
Secondary: Kamie Long, Forestry Board, kamie.long@colostate.edu or 970-248-7325

2019 Champion of the Arts Award

2019 Champion of the Arts PictureThe Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture proudly announces Troy Reynolds and FCI Constructors as the recipient of the 2019 Champion of the Arts Award. Troy & FCI were nominated by Gary Hauschulz, a local artist, along with 12 other artists who were involved with the 2019 Art on the Corner program. FCI has been voluntarily involved with Art on the Corner for 23 years and Troy for 19 years, and at least 100 current and past employees of FCI have been involved since the start of the program. FCI donates all of the equipment, labor, resources, skill, and expertise to effectively de-install and install the rotating exhibit, as well as relocate permanent sculptures. Every year, 8-12 employees organized by Troy appear before sunrise and work until the last sculpture is welded or bolted into place. This year there was a total of 31 sculptures. “The overwhelming support and knowledge of each volunteer from FCI is critical for the success of the Art on the Corner installation each year,” said Tina Ross, Art on the Corner Coordinator. “The physical and mechanical requirements brought by the volunteers to place the sculptures is rarely considered by the viewer. However, these behind the scenes heroes help make this all possible.”

All of the artists that participate in AOTC (Art on the Corner), some new, some for years, recognize the amazing skills, dedication and talent of the FCI crew to safely remove and set sculptures. The many quotes from participating artists echo this one from Kyle Ocean of Fort Collins who stated, “The installation process in Grand Junction for Art on the Corner is a breath of fresh air in the public art realm. The team is experienced in every aspect of installing public projects and has an answer to every hurdle you can throw their direction. They are efficient and extremely helpful, well prepared with tools and power options, and it makes the install incredibly easy and stress free. I look forward to my trips to Grand Junction in the fall and could not have higher regard for the team and program that make up Grand Junction’s Art on the Corner.”

As the award, the Grand Junction Commission on Arts and Culture placed a call for local artists. Compliments, a collaborative piece by Mary Mansfield and Tish Collins was chosen among 40 submissions. Troy Reynolds and FCI Constructors were honored with this award at the Centennial Band’s Holiday Light on Winter Night concert on Sunday, December 15 at Grand Junction High School.

Please join us in congratulating Troy Reynolds and FCI Constructors as the recipients of the 2019 Champion of the Arts Award.


For more information, please contact:
Primary: Lorie Gregor, Recreation Coordinator   lorieg@gjcity.org or 970-254-3876
Secondary: Callie Berkson, Marketing   callieb@gjcity.org or 970-254-3867